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Posts Tagged ‘search’

Firefox + Google = Free Music

Posted by Jason on October 8, 2008

There’s a lot you can do with Google if you can take advantage of it’s advanced search features.

Expanding on this tip which shows you how to find music in open directories, here’s a step-by-step walkthrough on how to use Firefox Smart Keyword searches to speed up the process.

All you need to do is:

  1. Create a bookmark in Firefox
  2. Use the URLs in this doc file as the bookmark location in your Firefox bookmarks (like in the pic above)
  3. Assign a keyword to it – eg. music
  4. Type the keyword (eg. music) followed by the search term (eg. beatles) directly into the address bar (NOT the search box). For example… type in music beatles , and Google will search open directories for Beatles music files that you can download.

You can modify the code in this doc file to change file extensions, which opens a whole window for you. For example, you can even change it to PDF and DOC to look to e-books, or AVI and MPG to look for movies.

By the way, I’m assuming you already own the media you will be downloading …

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5 Ways To Search For Files Using The Terminal

Posted by Jason on October 6, 2008

1) find : To search for files on the command line you can use the command “find”. The following is syntax for the “find” command:

find path criteria action

“path” The section of the files system to search (the specific directories and all the sub directories). If nothing is specified the file system below the current directory is used.

“criteria” The file properties.

“action” Options that influence conditions or control the search as a whole, ie,
“–print”

find

find

2) locate : The command “locate” is an alternative to the command “find -name”. The command find must search through the selected part of the file system, a process that can be quite slow. On the other hand, locate searches through a database previously created for this purpose (/var/lib/locatedb), making it much faster. The database is automatically created and updated daily. But change made after the update has been performed are not taken into account by locate, unless the database is updated manually using the command updatedb.

locate

locate

3) whereis : The command “whereis” returns the binaries (option -b), manual pages (option -m), and the source code (option -s) of the specific command. If no options is used all the information is returned, if the information is available. This command is faster than “find” but is less thorough.

whereis

whereis

4) which : The “which” command searches all paths listed in the variable PATH for the specific command and returns the full path of the command. the command is specifically useful if several version of a command exist in different directories and you want to know which version is executed when entered without specifying a path.

which

which

5) type : The “type” command can be used to find out what kind of command is executed when command is entered – a shell built in command or an external command. The option -a delivers all instances of a command bearing this name in the file system.

type

type

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